Senior triathletes shine in Ironman Hawaii 2013

Another Ironman Hawaii is in the books and the sleepy Hawaiian village of Kona can once again have it’s life back and in it’s wake, Senior triathletes shine in Ironman Hawaii 2013.

All the roads are open and it’s safe for locals to cast a line out from the pier or the seawall without snagging themselves an Ironman in training.

Ironman Hawaii 2013 like every Ironman before it that has ever taken place in this magical setting leaves behind it’s own mark, it’s own legacy, and it’s own huge vault of memories that will travel home with jubilant triathletes from around the world.

Those courageous athletes who made the final journey down Ali’i Drive will have stories to tell for years to come.

There may have been a day not so many years ago when many of them never imagined they were capable of such a feat, that deep inside they were capable of so much more than they ever thought possible.

It’s just as true of many people watching from the sidelines who were inspired on Saturday October 12, 2013 by what they witnessed. They too are perhaps thinking….maybe I could do that, maybe I could be an Ironman.

And it’s the moment they challenge themselves and say I’m going to be an Ironman when they first unleash the resolve, dedication, and physical strength and emotion that so many people have inside, but just don’t realize it quite yet.

This is what perpetuates the Ironman. This is what guarantees that this great event will be around for a long, long time.

When people watch an Ironman race unfold before them, often what they witness ignites something deep inside them and leads them down the same Ironman Highway that many of the inspiring competitors they were applauding had traveled.

Suddenly one day it’s their turn to travel the Ironman Highway to the finish line.

There was a time not that long ago when people would retire at 65 and stop doing anything and in effect, just wait for death and often it came far sooner than it had to. If you don’t ask your body to do anything, if it doesn’t get the signals to remain strong and sharp because you are going places and have things to get done, then it will basically shut down.

As the years pass by the results posted in the senior age-categories 60 years of age and older are particularly astounding and eye-opening.

The amount of competitors in these categories continues to grow every year and not only that……the times continue to get faster.

Just look at these results from Ironman Hawaii 2013…..

Thirty-five years ago who would have thought that one day 28 women would be entered in the 60-64 age-category and the first ten would finish in under 14 hours, or that there would be over 50 male entries in the same category and the top eighteen would be under 12 hours?

How about 18 women in the 65-69 category and Cullen Goodyear winning it with a 12:57, and 35 men in the same category with William Wren blazing across the line in 10:44? Wow!

And then there were the 18 finishers in the male 70-74 age-category and Milos Kostic winning it in an amazing 12:03:38 with the top five finishers all crossing the finish line under 14 hours.

How about the four triathletes in the 75-79 age-group. John Weber was first in 15:54.

And let’s not forget about Hiromu Inada who just missed the cut-off and crossed the line in 17:05. But after all, he was in the 80-84 category.

Since it’s inception some 35 years ago the Ironman Triathlon has given many seniors around the world the opportunity to test new physical, mental, and emotional boundaries at a time when life is supposedly winding down.

They are having no part of muscles atrophying and mental acuity diminishing. They’re not sitting in a rocking chair reminiscing about the good old days, but rather are diving into the pool, pulling on their runners, and hitting the dusty highway on their steeds of iron.

Old-age is a misconception to the senior triathlete and has no place in their lives.

And it’s a concept that had no place on that last magical finish-line stretch on Ali’i Drive in Ironman Hawaii on Saturday October 12, 2013.

FEMALE 60-64

Beverly Watson..............11:50:41
Rosemary Wedlake............12:08:46
Vanessa Cooney..............12:11:17
Mary Houbolt................12:22:25
Sandra 	Wendel..............13:19:58
Kathleen Richards...........13:40:26
Beryl Wilson................13:43:07
Francine Comeau.............13:44:18
Catherine Tulloh............13:48:45
Janet Watson................13:56:53

MALE 60-64

Oakes Ames..................10:19:08
Rick Simpson................10:38:50
Markus Jochum...............10:40:13
Len Ireland.................10:42:35
Gustav Foester..............10:43:58
Arthur Halttunen............10:52:58
Tomas Valena................11:16:58
Donn Ritchie................11:17:56
Raimund Schultz.............11:22:48
John Hellemans..............11:35:43

FEMALE 65-69

Cullen Goodyear.............12:57:17
Diane Ridgway...............13:04:03
Karla McKinlay..............13:27:13
Bente Lauritsen.............13:39:43
Marge Burley................13:41:31
Cherie Gruenfeld............14:00:48
Valerie Gonzales............14:17:35
Catharine Daly..............15:00:23
Tiare Lund..................15:08:53
Bobbe Greenberg.............15:33:52
Kimiko Matsuda..............15:36:39
Christine McKnight..........16:03:59
Melodie Cronenberg..........16:16:33
Dexter Yeats................16:54:26

MALE 65-69

William Wren.................10:44:31
Hermann Hefti................11:22:00
Allan Pitman.................11:37:38
Reinhold Humbold.............11:50:16
Gotthard Winkler.............12:06:47
Andrew Loeb..................12:10:50
Simon Butterworth............12:13:48
Borner Reinhard..............12:49:06
Patrick Bourdillon...........12:58:11
Koji Nobuka..................13:14:55
Jacque Harvey................13:20:42
Scott Balfour................13:20:56
Shinichi Muranaka............13:24:46
Bob Martin...................13:25:10
Bruno Billeter...............13:29:26
Ross Cation..................13:51:21
Robert Tebo..................13:52:50
Martin Metz..................13:59:29
Masayoshi Watanabe...........14:06:35
Rob Ladewig..................14:21:26
Peter Gillott................14:30:06
Alberto Paonessa.............14:37:54
Hubert Quadflieg.............14:40:13
Peter Sheridan...............14:48:33
Richard Nordquest............14:56:55
Gilberto Rivera..............15:04:34
Hisao Nagano.................15:09:51
Rudolf Brunner...............15:24:25
Lukas Gubler.................15:31:18
Dane Decker..................15:32:38
Jim Jacko.....................15:52:35

MALE 70-74

Milos Kostic.................12:03:38
Fidel Rotondaro..............13:10:41
Robert Plant.................13:19:11
Dwight Lundell...............13:39:15
Siegfried Schmidt............13:58:46
Hiroshi Nakata...............14:09:01
Roger Barker.................14:18:13
Mount Davis..................14:18:30
Gerhard Neye.................14:39:08
George Hulse.................15:12:23
Howard Glass.................15:17:40
Dean Paxson..................15:17:51
Merrill Schwartz.............15:30:09
Roger Little.................16:00:45
Dr. Joseph Maroon............16:03:48
Guenter Danel................16:06:52
Abdel Fustok.................16:08:05
Geoffrey Thorsen.............16:25:23

FEMALE 75-79

Harriet Anderson.............16:56:51

MALE 75-79

John Weber...................15:54:08
Neil Fleming.................15:57:47
Satoshi Tomita...............16:20:06
Joseph Vanhorn Van Horn......16:23:10

MALE 80-84

Hiromu Inada.................17:05:04

2013 IRONMAN HAWAII WORLD CHAMPION RESULTS
2012 IRONMAN HAWAII AGE-GROUP RESULTS
MORE RACE RESULTS FROM IRONSTRUCK
IRONSTRUCK HOME PAGE

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About Ray

Ray hasn’t stopped since his first Ironman in Kona, 1984. He has since run 14 more Ironman races, authored 5 Triathlon books, and is now bringing together a passionate community of triathletes. Contact Ray at ray@ironstruck.com

2 thoughts on “Senior triathletes shine in Ironman Hawaii 2013

  1. When John and I started the Hawaiian Iron Man Triathlon in Honolulu in 1978 the two of us were near 40, new to recreational sport, and our personal times dropped with each succeeding event. Then we left Hawaii and stopped training. Thank you, “Ironstruck” for posting the age group Kona times of our contemporaries, including the 80 and over. I may just put on my running shoes and get out the door. Judy Collins, Panamá

    Judy and John Collins
    Founders
    Iron Man Triathlon, 1978
    Portobelo Panamá Triathlon, 1998
    Inductees
    Ironman Hall of Fame, 1998

    • Thanks so much for your comment Judy and for visiting IronStruck.

      I’m sure I can speak for many people around the world when I say thank you to you and John for the positive impact the Ironman has had on so many of us.

      The Ironman has the magical power of inspiring ordinary people to do something truly extraordinary if they just take a leap of faith and for that shining moment in time believe in themselves.

      Best of all, it’s a gift that stays with them forever.

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